Tagged: maple syrup

Tipsy Pigs: Fat Washed Spirits and the Maple Bacon Bourbon Sour

Bacon. Bacon bacon bacon.

Bacon. Bacon bacon bacon.

Bacon. Washed. Bourbon.

And vodka.

Do I have your attention now? What better way to re-visit this neglected repository than with a tale of bacony-boozy deliciousness?

Basically, it began with me lying to my sister-in-law. I told her I was pretty certain Legacy carried Bakon vodka, which she had been wanting to pick up for caesars. Instead of calling and checking, we drove all the way over to find it sold out (which it had been for a long, long time – go Erin!). She was giving me sad-face, so I did what any good SIL would do – I suggested making our own!

I’ve been meaning to try fat-washing for a while, and I don’t know why it took me so long to get around to it – the process is pretty damn easy. If you can fry up bacon, you can make delicious, porky booze! So after researching a few dozen how-tos, I smushed them all together with some common sense to come up with this method:

  1. Purchase your desired spirit(s). We chose Russian Standard Vodka (my favourite for infusions – it’s cheap, clean and neutral) and Four Roses Bourbon (same goes).
  2. Purchase your bacon. Buy more than you think you’ll need. We bought the 1kg package of Harvest bacon, which wasn’t the best choice – while it’s damn delicious, it’s fairly lean. You want something fattier, but still decent quality (because, duh, flavour). I’m going to keep my eyes peeled for the seldom seen pack of (super fatty) bacon ends from Harvest, next time.
  3. Locate yourself some wide-mouth jars, around a pint in size. We actually ended up using our unreturned Earnest Ice Cream jars, because their tops are nice and wide and, also, we never remember to return them, so we have lots.
  4. Cook off the bacon in a pan. The pan’s important, as you’ll render more fat than if you cook it in the oven. Be prepared to do lots of batches. As each batch comes out of the pan, pour the fat into some kind of container. We used a pyrex liquid measure, and poured until we got 1/2c or so each time. At that point…
  5. Pour the fat into your jar, and then add your spirits (we filled them to around 2/3 – 3/4 full altogether). Shake it like a polaroid picture, and set on the counter.
  6. Leave that jar on the counter for about half an hour while the fat separates from the liquour, and then place it in the freezer for a couple of hours or so.
  7. Repeat those steps until you run out of bacon or spirits.
  8. After the alotted time, pull your jars out of the freezer. The fat should be a solid layer on top of the spirits, now.
  9. Open your jar, and rather gently break through the fat layer with a spoon. Or knife. Or spork. Whatever. Break through, and remove the chunks of solidified bacon fat. You can toss ’em, or reserve them for cooking.
  10. The straining process depends on how fastidious you are. I’d recommend straining through a fine mesh strainer into/through a coffee filter, though cheesecloth works too. Just be aware that, as it’s not as fine, some solids might make it through, so it doesn’t store as well.
  11. Pour the brew into your container of choice (I use flip-top bottles). And you’re done! Be sure to store in the fridge.

See, easy! Time consuming, but easy. On the bright side, you’ll be left with a lot of crispy, delicious bacon just sitting on your kitchen counter…I’m sure you can figure out something to do with that. Nancy (the SIL) used a couple pieces in place of beans in her caesers, for instance. I just nommed it.

The nice thing about fat washing is that it’s great for instant gratification. Generally, infusions take weeks, but you can start this in the afternoon and make yourself something delicious that evening. In fact, I have a suggestion for that:

The Maple Bacon Bourbon Sour (because bacon. and maple. of course)

  • 2oz. bacon infused bourbon
  • 1 oz. lemon juice
  • 1/4 oz. maple syrup
  • 1 egg white (beaten – stolen tip from Jeffrey Morgenthaler)
  • 2 dashes black walnut bitters

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and dry-shake. Add ice, and shake more. Strain over ice into a rocks glass. Garnish as you like – I just dripped a drop of the black walnut bitters for the smokiness on the nose.

Now that I’ve fat-washed, what’s next? Chorizo tequila? Duck confit vodka? Who knows!

The Hotel Georgia & The Filibuster

Ah, egg whites. I like you quite a bit. In omelettes, where I can pretend you’re more healthy and thus add five times the amount of cheese (doric feta ftw!). In meringues, where you get all crunchy and chewy and oh-my-god-delicious. And, of course, in cocktails, where you make drinks downright velvety. Now that you and I understand your particularly special needs in said cocktails, can we be friends?

After my comparable success with the Clover Club, I was left with almost half a carton of eggs. Though we circumvented the quick corruption our fridge normally exacts (Alex sealed the carton in a ziploc), fresh is only fresh for so long. So I decided I’d start out with another drink that I have repeatedly failed at. Because that’s always a solid idea, no?

Shortly after our first dinner at Hawksworth, back when they opened, I made Alex promise to beg the recipe for the Hotel Georgia cocktail from the bar manager next time he saw him. He, being a good man, brought it home to me in no time at all. So I tried it, and…it was awful. Things I didn’t know at the time: the importance of dry shaking, the importance of fresh lemon juice, the importance of fresh eggs, the importance of double straining. Did I mention that I spent my very brief time as a bartender pulling pints and mixing highballs and appletinis? I didn’t exactly have the best knowledge base.

Since I had had similar challenges with the Clover Club, I figured I could give it another shot while my luck was good. I put it all together with crossed toes (crossed fingers don’t give the best grip on the shaker), and poured. And tasted. And had Alex taste to make sure it wasn’t just my own wishful thinking. But turns out, it was damn good!

Rawr indicates bad lighting.

I’m sharing this here as it’s already been published by Melody Fury on Serious Eats, so I’m not spilling any secret beans.

The Hotel Georgia

  • 1.75 oz. gin (they use Plymouth)
  • .5 oz. orgeat
  • .75 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 6 drops of orange water (I like that measurement, straight from the aforementioned article – so delicate-sounding!)
  • 1 fresh egg white
  • nutmeg for garnish

Combine everything but the nutmeg in a shaker, and give it a dry shake (no ice) for about 20 seconds, until you feel the mixture change consistency (should feel less sloshy, a little smoother). Add ice, shake again just to chill. Pour everything into a chilled cocktail glass. Grate/sprinkle nutmeg to garnish.

So then, since I figured that that went pretty well, I might as well ride my luck a little longer. I pulled up another recipe that’s been languishing on my list while I’ve been moping about egg whites. May I present, the Filibuster!

If the name alone doesn’t make you want to give it a shot, consider this: you probably have everything you need already sitting in your fridge. And I’ll say this: this pretty thing exceeded my expectations. Alex tried it, and we agreed the balance of it made me seem far more skilled than I really am.

The Filibuster

  • 1.5 oz. bourbon
  • .75 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • .25 oz. maple syrup
  • dash black walnut bitters (my substitution – recipe calls for Angostura)
  • 1 large fresh egg white

Same method as the Hotel Georgia. Everything goes in for a dry shake until the consistency changes (~20-30 seconds). Add ice, shake again to chill. Pour into your cocktail glass, and garnish with a slip of lemon (which looks oh-so-pretty against the foam). I’ll note, I had to dump my first attempt as I made the dumb mistake of separating my egg over the shaker. So don’t do that.